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20130113
20130121
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3 (some duplicates have been removed)
attached to it. >> heather: let's talk about the economy. the president starts his new term. less than 1% rate it as excellent. 9% say it's good shape. that is up a touch from his first inauguration but 91% of voters say economic conditions negatively today. why are we here again? >> you have to wonder. i point you back to november the conditions haven't changed all that much in two months. i would imagine that those exact numbers were the same on election day, and the american people not only re-elected the president but gave us the same senate in the house as we had before. so as much as they are saying economy isn't going well, when they had an opportunity to change things they voted for more of the same. >> heather: you mentioned congress, finally two polls dealing with that. first since president obama was re-elected, 30% think he has been more bipartisan in working with congressional republicans, 55% the majority says he has been more confrontational? >> i think some of the number for confrontational they are saying that as a positive. certainly democrats want him to be more confro
in an effort to fight lower enrollment rates due to the bad economy. is this trend going to continue? joining us to talk about it is university maryland economist peter morris se789. half of the declines, why are more young are deciding to forgo college education? >> the cost have jumped a lot and the graduates can't find jobs. there is a sense that it doesn't pay out. you get set with a lot of big loans and join the service, learn a trade. go to a community college and skip university all together. >> gregg: president obama wants everybody to go to college? >> it doesn't pay out. most stated universities offer diplomas that don't lead to a marketable skill. there are too many graduates working at starbucks these days. >> gregg: "wall street journal" analyzed this way. take a look at this. facing stagnant family income, shaky job prospects and a smaller pool of high school graduates, more schools are reining in tuition costs. is it possible that some tuition costs may actually go down, or we simply talking about slowing the rate of increase? >> i think it's slowing the rate of increase. it's
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3 (some duplicates have been removed)